Batch sequence

I see in the SYSOBJH documentation a section titled Migration from NATUNLD/NATLOAD and SYSTRANS to the Object Handler. In that section, there is a mention of batch sequence with the following example:
SYSOBJH SYSTRANS
U
N,N,N,Y,N,N,N,N
N
SRCLIB1,PGM1,*,TGTLIB1

Where is this documented? We have this being used in old code (nearly 20 years old). None of the developers are around and there is no doc or comments. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

So the SYSTRANS is gone, but its old command syntax lives on? Sounds like you need a copy of an old SYSTRANS manual.

From the Natural 4.2.4 Release Notes, 03/25/2008:

Do you have a DBA or system programmer who did the installs back then that you can ask? Or rifle through their manual bookshelves or Documentation CDs?

Sorry I can’t seem to find SYSTRANS in my old Nat 4.2.4 documentation.

Regards,
George

Thanks for your response. What this says to me is that I have to use the new way to perform the unload function. I can disregard all of the old stuff.

That sounds like the best option. And you can get the documentation for SYSOBJH. I believe SYSOBJH does everything that SYSTRANS could, and probably more. I think the main difference is that SYSTRANS could copy objects from one environment/library directly to another one, while SYSOBJH writes objects out to a sequential work file and then a second step reads the work file and writes the objects to the destination environment/library.

When I did a scan on the forums for SYSTRANS I found this posting from someone in the same situation as you. Ralph Zbrog provided some tips on how to use SYSOBJH commands instead of the old SYSTRANS syntax.

http://tech.forums.softwareag.com/techjforum/posts/list/23546.page

Good luck,
George

It’s true that SYSOBJH is used to unload/backup/reload objects to/from external (work) files and it can be used to move between databases and different platforms.
SYSMAIN exists to move objects directly between libraries in the same system and can be used easily on-line with no need to use an external (intermediate) file system. It’s also useful for listing all the libraries in a system file.
Cheers,
Mick.